Without Giving Way: Celebrating the life of Chris Kyle

“Let’s be real for just a second. You have to be a lover of innocence, to be a warrior…” Those words were from Taya Kyle, wife of the late Chris Kyle. Known most notably by the story of his life embodied by the book and movie, American Sniper. Today, February 2nd, 2020, we want to…

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What Does It Mean to Be an American?

When asked about my involvement in Task Force Pineapple, a citizen-liaison network which successfully evacuated more than 800 Americans and Afghan allies during a one-week period between the fall of the Afghan government and military and the “official” exit of U.S. troops, I tell them this …

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Freedom is a Gift

Our forebears were awestruck at the sight of her; welcoming them proudly, holding her tablets and hoisting her torch high above her head in all her glorious splendor. As they stepped off the ships, they were awestruck and filled with hope at the thought of their new lives as they read the words at Lady…

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Relentless

Relentless. Merriam-Webster says it’s, showing or promising no abatement of severity, intensity, strength, or pace. It’s a word often used when describing a ferocious animal in the wild. Which is why I chose the Honey Badger for our graphic. Many people think of a lion, or a bear when they think of this word, but…

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Part Two Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: Ozzie Martinez Story

Ozzie Martinez, a marine combat veteran, struggled deeply with PTSD after two deployments to Iraq. In Ozzie’s inspirational story, he emphasizes not only the importance of a positive mindset, but how to use that mindset to pick yourself back up, even when you’ve hit rock bottom. His family fled communist Cuba before he was born,…

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Strength, Balance and Resiliency as Leaders | Part Four: Emotional Leadership

Rollercoasters: I love them. Stepping off the new Jurassic World VelociCoaster recently, I felt strong, invigorated, as if I’d “conquered” something bigger than me, and eager to go again. Boarding an emotional roller coaster is an entirely different thing. We’re not necessarily wired, willing or braced for psychological whiplash. Stepping away from an emotional rollercoaster, we typically feel confused, undermined, destabilized, beaten up, and eager to mentally and/or physically quit. Great leaders are strong in Emotional Leadership. People follow them because they want to, not because they feel trapped. What kind of ride are you engineering?

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